Conservation council cautiously welcomes end of drought in SA

SANDY, Texas - The South Texas Conservation Council has expressed confidence that a drought will soon end in southeastern Texas.

SCCC President Tony Bracco said the group has a history of putting drought into perspective and believes its drought prediction model will provide reliable drought data for future years.

Bracco said that this year will likely see two dry years.

The prediction model, called the Drought Severity Index, is used to forecast water stress and rainfall levels across the state. SCCC has published its model on the Web site of the 바카라사이트University of Texas at Austin and has been receiving reports of similar models at other institutions.

Branco said that the Drought Severity Index model was developed for the purpose of providing local policymakers and state agenci더킹카지노es with a better understanding of the state's dry condition.

The drought is expected to last from October through January, when the high elevations near the state's east edge, such as Fort Bend County, become dry to mid-summer, the SCCC said.

But if a dry spell occurs as a result of a strong El Nino, the model will project a dry-season for the eastern part of the state, especially in southeast Texas. The models also have predictions that the western parts of the state will experience wetter temperatures.

Dramatic improvement in drought in southeast Texas predicted

To help residents and businesses across the region plan for the changes, Bracco said the organization had rec더킹카지노ently produced a new, updated water stress information system for residents. It's available by emailing WaterSavers@water.utexas.edu.

"We're hoping that the information we are releasing this year, including drought conditions as well as potential future drought, will help us manage that drought while also improving the state's water management," Bracco said.

The organization will release its next drought forecast at a planned conference, hosted by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, in September. Bracco said it will be released online with information about the predicted droughts and water resources available in southeastern Texas.

The SCCC also is urging those who plan to live in areas facing frequent drought events to think about how other states might respond to such events.

Bracco said drought is one of the greatest challenges faced in the country, but he said that some states are making progress with more aggressive restrictions on residential development, as opposed to more severe policies such as imposing more restrictions on energy development, whic